TFG Properties

100% of TFG ownership is under a sustainable land management plan


Today, our ownership constitutes 2.3M acres in 18 U.S. states as well as Canada, Costa Rica, and Panama.

TFG manages natural forests in the following locations:

USA




The regional teams working in conjunction with local forestry consulting firms are responsible for the daily, on-ground management activities and property oversight. To learn more about our properties, management activities, and contact information, we encourage you to review the information contained within the map. 

Based on 2020 data.

 

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TFG sustainably manages working forests throughout North and Central America.

Great Lakes Region

251,441 Acres (4Q2020)

Properties under management in the Great Lakes Region are located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Northern Wisconsin and Northern Minnesota. Timber types range from natural stands of northern hardwoods, aspen, spruce, fir and pine in the uplands to spruce, cedar, tamarack, ash and lowland complexes on the wetter soils. Some of the properties also have plantations of red and jack pine, tamarack and white spruce established on them. The general management focus is toward natural regeneration systems for both hardwood and softwood timber types. A variety of intermediate treatments are utilized to encourage regeneration, diversify species mix, and improve the growth and vigor of residual stems. Harvesting activities can occur throughout the year. However activities often slow in the spring during a period known as “Break-Up”.

Southern Region

930,969 Acres (4Q2020)

Properties within this region span the width of the U.S. southern states and into the Appalachian Mountains, including Florida, North and South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Arkansas and Louisiana. A wide variety of timber types grow in the region ranging from both natural and planted pine to bottomland, alluvial river, and upland Appalachian hardwoods. The land base supports forests that receive an array of silvicultural treatments designed to improve timber quality, health and growth while preserving, and often enhancing, recreation opportunities and aesthetics. The overall management focus for this region is toward natural regeneration systems. However, where pine plantations are located, the majority of these acres are managed as is with a small proportion allowed to naturally convert to a pine-hardwood stand.

Northeast Region

280,086 Acres (4Q2020)

Properties under management in the Northeast Region are located in 5 US states, including New Hampshire, New York, Maryland, Virginia and Delaware. Timber types range from loblolly pine and southern bottomland hardwoods in the coastal plains of Maryland and Virginia, to Allegheny and Northern hardwoods in Pennsylvania and New York and into eastern Canada. The general management focus is toward natural regeneration systems for both hardwood and softwood timber types. A variety of intermediate treatments are utilized to encourage regeneration response, diversify species mix, and improve the growth and vigor of residual stems. Harvesting activities can occur year round though the majority of the activity occurs in the winter months. 

Appalachian Region

377,520 Acres (4Q2020)

Properties under management in the Appalachian Region are located in 4 different states, including West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. Timber types range from natural Appalachian Hardwoods to northern hardwood and loblolly pine plantations. The general management focus is toward natural regeneration systems for both hardwood and softwood timber types. A variety of intermediate treatments are utilized to encourage regeneration response, diversify species mix, and improve the growth and vigor of residual stems. Harvesting activities can occur year round though the majority of the activity occurs in the summer months. 

Canada

228,851 Acres (4Q2020)

Properties under management are located in the Algoma District of Ontario, east of Lake Superior. Timber types range from natural stands of northern hardwoods, aspen, spruce, fir, and pine in the uplands to spruce, cedar, tamarack, ash and lowland complexes on the wetter soils. The general management focus is toward natural regeneration systems for both hardwood and softwood timber types. A variety of intermediate treatments are utilized to encourage regeneration, diversify species mix, and improve the growth and vigor of residual stems. Harvesting activities can occur throughout the year. However activities often slow in spring during a period known as “Break-Up”. 

Central America

16,608 Acres (4Q2020)

TFG’s Central American Region includes forested properties in Costa Rica and Panama. Both countries share a pronounced dry season, usually around January through April, that affects the timing of operations such as timber harvesting and tree planting.

In Costa Rica, the Caribbean Timberlands property is comprised of four farms totaling 8,691 acres, located in central/east Costa Rica’s Cartago and Limón provinces. This area is characterized by hilly terrain and mountains, leveling off across a coastal plain toward the Caribbean Sea.

The soils in the mountainous part of Costa Rica are ultisols, typically red to orange or brown and containing no calcareous material, with high clay content. In the coastal plain, soils are predominantly inceptisols, gray to brown clay and silt loams that are not particularly fertile, and can be productive when property managed.

All four farms include tree plantations within a matrix of natural forest patches and corridors. The upland farms are planted with two pine species, plus eucalyptus. The lowland farm is planted with Gmelina, a fast-growing broadleaf species used for its white wood.

In Panama, TFG manages four separate properties all of which are teak plantations located in or near the Darien Province. Teak is grown on approximately 20-year rotations with several intermediate thinnings over that time span. Harvests ramp up in the beginning of the year when soils are dry and less prone to impacts from machinery. Teak planting begins in the rainy season to ensure early survival for the young trees. Most of the harvested teak is shipped to India although some is consumed in local markets.